Pool FAQs Header Image

Select a category or browse the frequently asked questions below.

  • Pool Pumps
    Polaris Cleaners
    Pool Filters
  • Salt Water Systems
    Mineral Purifiers
    Heaters



  • Pool Pump FAQs
  • Q: My pool pump will not prime with water - air in the pump strainer basket.
  • A: First, check for a missing or damaged O-Ring on the lid of the pump. This is the most likely scenario, and easy to solve. Many times, the lid O-Ring falls off when cleaning out the pump strainer trap, resulting in the pump sucking air through the lid, instead of water through the plumbing. If the O-Ring is present and is without damage, try applying some silicone based lubricant, then tighten up the lid. Next, check that there are no CLOSED VALVES in the system. Then, check the pump basket, and the skimmer basket, for clogs. Also, take a look at the intake of the skimmer - if your skimmer has a weir door, many times it will get stuck in the up position, "starving" the skimmer for water. Next, check the water level in the pool. Your pool's water level should be half way up the skimmer throat. If none of these steps solve the problem, you most likely have a suction leak, somewhere between the pump and the pool - on the intake side of the pump.
  • Q: How much is my pool pump costing me in electricity consumption? AMPS and VOLTS are found on your pump's motor tag. And you may have to call your electric company to find out what your KWH cost is.
  • A: (AMPS x VOLTS / 1000) x Cost per KWH x Hours per day the pump runs = Cost per day
  • Q: Pump motor wont start, no sound.
  • A: If motor is COOL: check the power at the motor terminals - if there is no voltage, check the fuses, circuit breaker, timers, and switches. If voltage is present, then turn voltage off and check for open protector and open winding. If the motor is HOT: check the voltage at the motor terminals. The voltage should be within 10% of the nameplate rating. If voltage is low, check for proper supply wire size. Contact an electrician if necessary. If voltage is ok at the disconnect, turn power off and check for loose connections, undersized wiring, overloaded circuit, or other causes of voltage drop. If low voltage isn't the cause, check that the start contacts are closing; also, check if the capacitor (if used) is shorted or open; check that the motor windings aren't open or shorted, compare terminal board connections with diagram, or name plate for voltage present. Check motor shaft - if tight, or does not turn, check the bearings - look for cracks in the end shield; clogged fan; debris in pump, or corrosion between shaft and seal.

  • Salt Water System FAQs ( Salt water chlorine generators )
  • Q: How do I add salt to my salt water pool?
  • A: Turn pump on to circulate the swimming pool water. Turn the chlorine generator off, or turn the dial to 0%. Determine the amount of salt to be added to the pool. Broadcast the salt around the outer perimeter of the pool. DO NOT add salt through the skimmer. Brush the pool bottom, and allow water to circulate for 24 hours to dissolve the salt completely. 24 hours after adding salt, test the salt level, and turn the system on.
  • Q: How much salt does a salt system require?
  • A: Different manufacturers require different levels of salt. The Aqua Rite™ system works best with approximately 3200 ppm salt, which is roughly the equivalent to a teaspoon per gallon. However, the Aqua Rite™ will operate with salt levels anywhere from 2700 ppm to 3400 ppm. Check the manufacturer's requirements for the right amount for your system.
  • Q: What kind of pool can i use a salt system with?
  • A: Salt water chlorinators are compatible with all pool finishes--vinyl, plaster, fiberglass, and pebble.
  • Q: What kind of maintenance is involved with a salt system?
  • A: Test the chlorine level, and salt level of the pool on a weekly basis. As a general rule, the salt Cell should be inspected and cleaned every three months, or when starting up the system.
  • Q: What type of salt do I use?
  • A: The PREFERRED SALT is an evaporated, granulated, FOOD QUALITY salt. DO NOT use salt with yellow prussiate of soda, or any anti-caking agent, with the Chlorinator. Water conditioning SALT PELLETS ( compressed forms of evaporated salt ) may be used, but will take longer to dissolve. Rock salt is least desirable, because of insoluble impurities (dirt mixed with rock salt).

  • Mineral Purifier FAQs
  • Q: Do I still need to use chlorine?
  • A: Yes, you will need to use a small amount of residual oxidizer. With Nature2 you can reduce your chlorine consumption amount by up to 80%. For best results, low levels of free chlorine are recommended ( 0.6 ppm free chlorine minimum ). You won't feel, smell, or be affected by chlorine at this level.
  • Q: How often will i need to super-oxidize ( "shock" ) the pool?
  • A: Because of the efficiency of Mineral Purifiers, you should only need to super-oxidize about half as often as you would otherwise. You should super-oxidize if the pool becomes dull or cloudy, after heavy bather load, or after bad weather. With each new cartridge, you should perform an initial shock with chlorine..

  • Pool Filters FAQs
  • Q: Why am i experiencing short cycles between filter backwashes?
  • A: Short filter cycles either indicate excessive flow rate through the filter because of an incorrect filter size, or a large amount of pool contaminants. If you have a DE filter, clogging of the mesh on the filter grids (whether by rust, calcium buildup or soda ash) may increase the pressure and cause ineffective filtration. The solution is to clean the filter elements and check for clogging of the fine nylon mesh covering the grids. If the grids need a good cleaning, treat it to a light acid wash while hosing with a strong stream of water, this will usually solve the problem. ( See also "My cartridge / DE filter suffers from scale or mineral buildup..." below )
  • Q: My filter has a buildup of air, what do I do?
  • A: After thoroughly washing and soaking the cartridge in a solution (water and trisodium phosphate), you’ll need to drizzle a couple of drops of muriatic acid on the cartridge to see if foaming or bubbling takes place, if so, it needs to be washed in a mild acid solution. In a five-gallon bucket, mix 20 parts water to 1 part muriatic acid and place the cartridge in the bucket. Using a scoop to pour solution over the element, continue washing it until the bubbling stops. Rinse the filter cartridge completely and neutralize the solution in order to dispose of it in an ecologically safe manner.
  • Q: My cartridge / DE filter suffers from scale or mineral buildup, what do I do?
  • A: Short filter cycles either indicate excessive flow rate through the filter because of an incorrect filter size, or a large amount of pool contaminants. If you have a DE filter, clogging of the mesh on the filter grids (whether by rust, calcium buildup or soda ash) may increase the pressure and cause ineffective filtration. The solution is to clean the filter elements and check for clogging of the fine nylon mesh covering the grids. If the cartridge / DE grids need a more thorough cleaning due to calcium buildup ( scaling ) or rust, treat them to a light acid wash - soaking in a solution of 1 part muriatic acid to 3 parts water. Rinse the cartridge / DE elements completely and neutralize the solution in order to dispose of it in an ecologically safe manner. This usually will solve the problem. There is also an excellent product, designed to reduce / prevent incidence of scale buildup. Please see this item on our product page - called Scaletec Plus
  • Q: Why is sand or DE entering my pool?
  • A: If your filter is has a push-pull valve the first thing you want to look for is if it is left in an intermediate position, allowing media to flow back into the pool. After you’ve checked that, and you have a sand filter, broken laterals or undersized sand are common culprits here (where replacement is the only solution). If you have a DE filter, take a look at the septa. If the septa is torn or worn-out, the nylon mesh on the septa can be repaired depending on how bad it is torn. If there’s a hole the size of a pencil lead, DE will be able to escape. Always check the points on the septa where the mesh is sewn to the frame of the grid. DE might be finding its way back into the pool by way of the main drain or skimmer when the pump shuts off. Excessive flow rate through the filter can also force sand or DE into the pool. Check the size of your filter and pump. A damaged internal air bleed also will allow DE back into the pool. Be sure there’s a check valve between the filter and the pump if you open up the DE filter, DE will flow back through the pump into the pool through the skimmer.

  • Heaters FAQs
  • Q: Should I winterize my heater?
  • A: Yes, In areas where freezing temperatures occur in winter and the pool or spa will not be used, have your service technician perform the following steps:1. Turn off the main gas supply to the heater, using the gas cock outside the heater jacket.2. Remove heater door. 3. Shut down the heater following the shutdown instructions found on the inside of the heater. 4. Remove the drain plugs from both the inlet/outlet header and the return header and completely drain the heater before the first frost. 5. After all water has drained from the heater, check for mineral buildup in the openings. 6. Use compressed air to blow out any standing water remaining in the heat exchanger. 7. Inspect the gaskets on the drain plugs and reinstall plugs, but do not tighten. 8. Disconnect the pressure switch from the siphon loop. 9. Cover the heater and the vent grill so that snow will not accumulate in the combustion chamber, where it may freeze.
  • Q: What about spring start-up?
  • A: To restart the heater in the Spring, have a qualified professional technician reassemble the heater as follows: 1. Tighten the drain plug. 2. Uncover the vent grill. 3. Make sure that power is supplied to the pump. Turn on the fi lter pump and circulate water through the heater for 5 minutes. Check for leaks while circulating. 4. Turn on the main gas supply to the heater at the gas cock outside the heater jacket. 5. Turn on the heater following the lighting instructions found on the inside of the heater, or in the manual.

  •